Monthly Archives: August 2016

What you can do with a poem

I somehow encountered a time warp this week, and Monday is long past. Even Tuesday, and here it is Wednesday, and despite being fully “retired” I have not had the moment to sit down and put up a poem for … Continue reading

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Rivalry

I read Larry a line from this review of The Art of Rivalry, a study of influences a group of modernist painters had on each other: “Lucien Freud declining a wedding invitation because he found himself ‘in the unusual position … Continue reading

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George Oppen

George Oppen is a poet who seems to have faded from view. But his sensibility is intriguing.  His focus was on simplicity–using language to point to the experience as opposed to itself. Here’s a snippet: Pedestrian What generations could have dreamed … Continue reading

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Discoveries

The other day I made fig jam–one of my all time favorites. But in trying to speed up the process, I scorched the bottom of my enamel pot. I scrubbed and scrubbed, but couldn’t get the fine layer of burnt … Continue reading

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Molly Peacock

I had a chance to look at a book of poems by Molly Peacock in a friend’s library. This one reminded me of a moment when i saw my parents sharing an apricot, by far my tenderest and most intimate memory … Continue reading

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The art of the short poem

Does anyone do it better than this? Married I came back from the funeral and crawled around the apartment, crying hard, searching for my wife’s hair. For two months got them from the drain, from the vacuum cleaner, under the … Continue reading

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A Meal in Winter

This extraordinary little book is told as if a memoir, in very straightforward, matter-or-fact prose, which makes it all the more chilling. It is translated from the French by Sam Taylor. The basic plot concerns three German soldiers who no longer … Continue reading

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Olds’ Odes

If you’ve never heard Sharon Olds read, this is a good example: or this, a poem I woke up thinking about this morning: The Missing Boy (for Etan Patz) Every time we take the bus my son sees the picture … Continue reading

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